Sunday, December 9, 2012

Hank Williams Sr. (Various)




By Blair Mays (1)....

I am the only other living witness to the death of Hank Williams. His death occurred between 3 and 4pm Dec. 31, 1952… not Jan 1, 1953. His death occurred in the parking lot of the King Tut Drive In... just outside Bluefield WV... Hank had just been hit hard by a drunk regular in the family jewels... and was the ejected (believe it or not) by owner Sox White. Hank passed out in the back seat of the Cadillac and he sent me (a kid who ran for chasers all day for tips IE; in and out for the used car dealership next door).

Driver Car sent me in to get Sox when he couldn’t determine if Hank was alive. Owner Sox whose wife was a nurse put a mirror in front of Hank’s nose and then mouth and pronounced Hank dead and told driver Carr to get off the premises. Carr left the Tut at about 4pm and picked up taxi driver Donny Surface about an hour later. (Hank and Surface had spent Dec 31, 1952 at the King Tut, arriving about 10am that morning). The new driver Donnie Surface was the boyfriend of Hazel Schultz... the waitress at the Tut. Instead of taking Hank to the hospital Carr spent an hour at least waiting for Surface’s taxi shift to end. They both continued on later on the snowy treacherous roads of 1950’s West Virginia. It was Surface who finally reached back and found Hank stiff and cold at Oak Hill WV early Jan 1, 1953. Surface wore Hank’s white cowboy jacket for years afterwards (he was only about 90 pounds like Hank). Surface has gotten away with what might be considered negligent homicide for all these years.

Driver Carr and Hank evidently left Knoxville on Dec 30–not Dec 31 1952 as I remember them arriving in Bluefield at the King Tut Drive- In at about 10am on Dec 31, 1952.

There is an arrest record in Tennessee for which Carr was cited for speeding which should settle that. There is a story that Hank obtained morphine (or whatever) from a Dr. Horton in Bluefield– this doctor was repeatedly busted for dispensing drugs without a prescription or perfunctorily thru-out the 50’s. I have no way of verifying that but can testify to the following.

I was in and out of the Tut all day as was my usual itinerary those days, and observed Hank with one and maybe no more than 2 beers– of which he drank little or none. I did observe Hank injecting something into his arm while sitting in the back seat of the Cadillac less than hour before his death (about 4pm Dec 31, 1952).

In fact Driver Carr sent me inside the Tut to get Tut owner Sox White; Sox tried to get Hank to withdraw the needle, but the damage was already done. Less than an hour later Carr sent me in to get Sox again. Sox came out and checked Hank’s pulse and then went back inside and got a mirror which he placed under Hank’s nose. (Sox’s wife was nurse at he hospital in town). He told Carr “this man is dead and get him the hell off premises as he didn’t want an trouble here.” Carr left and only came back to the Tut after he reported Hank’s death about 12 hours later and 50 miles up the road at Oak Hill WV. Hank’s Cadillac and two or three police cars were at the Tut from about 5-9 pm the next day Jan 1, 1953. Sox and waitress Hazel Schultz paid 2 visits to the car business next door that belonged to my dad and forcefully insisted that I shut up and stay out of the Tut while the cops were there.

The reason why Carr and Hank spent the day at the Tut was that they were waiting for Bluefield taxi driver Danny Surface to get off taxi duty. Snow was flying and the weather was turning bad. Pre-Interstate WV roads were extremely treacherous in those days and Carr had driven over 2 mountains, each of which took about an hour at 15 mph in good weather–the second mountain immediately before Bluefield.

The connection of the second driver was made at the Tut–Danny Surface was waitress Hazel Schultz’s boyfriend. Hank and original driver Carr went uptown at about 12pm Dec 31 to the Dough Boy Diner where taxi drivers hung out between rides– to arrange for Surface to take over driving duties (to Charleston WV). Carr and Hank returned to the Tut before 1 pm.

As the name indicates the Doughboy was your typical WWI joint and was quite derelict by then. The Tut was your stereotypical WWII WV beer joint. It was built with a surplus Quonset hut in 1945 but was paneled in real hardwood inside and was quite a place with a wrap-around bar. Sox had a stainless steel kitchen and had the best short orders in town.

About 20-30 people saw Hank there that day–but no one paid too much attention to Hank except Hazel Schultz–who swooned and acted much like a rock and roll groupie from the 60’s. Hazel had left at about 3pm to work a shift at the already mentioned Doughboy. (ie she double shifted all the way through the 50’s and became owner of the Tut after Sox died in the 70’s). The juke box was extremely dull in 52 except for left-over WWII swing tunes and 2 or 3 of Hank’s tunes. After Hank died several more of his tunes became hits. A Hank tune was playing on the art deco Juke when he first came in that morning and through-out the day.

Hank was extremely sick the whole day and spent most of time leaning on the counter. He was ejected by Sox after Hazel left at about 3pm for fighting. Driver Car was outside in the Cadillac running the heater while it happened. A bar regular was dancing on the dance floor with his girl friend to a Hank tune and drunkenly started beating her up on the floor. Hank jumped up from the bar stool and got between them. The drunk who was about 280lbs hit Hank hard with an uppercut to the nuts. Sox always responded to these things with a butcher knife waving over his head and EJECTED HANK INSTEAD OF THE DRUNK– after all the drunk was a REGULAR. Most of those barflies who saw Hank that day didn’t believe it was actually him. Some like Sox didn’t care or considered him as just a “washed up radio singer” who had just been ejected from the Opry. Superstar Hank didn’t emerge until after his death.

It was common knowledge around Bluefield that Hank was at the Tut and Doughboy the day of his death during the 50’s on up into the 60’s. The local newspaper was right beside the Doughboy in those days and never printed anything about his death, but merely reprinted an article from Oak Hill.

Maybe the drug connection was too much, but there is no way they couldn’t have known. In about 59-60 Patsy Cline and Hank’s first wife paid the Tut a short visit. Hazel and Sox paid my dad a visit and told me to keep my mouth shut. Patsy Cline had gone to beautician’s school in Bluefield right before her Career took off less than a mile from the Tut. By the late 60’s the common knowledge based on first hand experience was waning with death of the Tut patrons of the early 50’s.

It is pretty certain that taxi driver Danny Surface didn’t know that Hank was already dead when he took over as driver from Carr. It is unknown what they did with the dead Hank in the back seat from about 5 or 6pm Dec 31 until the death was reported about 12 hours later. Evidently there was an arrangement with Hank’s property in the trunk as Surface admitted selling 2 handguns belonging to Hank on several occasions when he stopped by my dad’s car lot during the 50’s and 60’s. He was very slight of build and oftentimes wore one of Hank’s white handmade cowboy jackets until his death. This jacket is the same one as that which appeared on a record jacket cover.

If you examine the 50’s version of the death you will see Danny Surface mentioned in all the accounts including that of the undertaker. He is listed as the driver at the time of the death. Later accounts by Carr delete him altogether or alternately list him as being picked up in Tennessee–where he never lived in his life–he was a life-long resident of Bluefield. Early accounts by Carr mention “a stop” at the Doughboy (which was off the main road unlike the Tut). Later accounts after Surface died eliminate any mention of stopping in Bluefield at all.

I am willing to take a lie detector test to verify these facts. I would like to see Carr do the same thing and own up to negligent homicide for not taking Hank to the hospital after Sox ejected them from the Tut. He has been living on Hank’s legend since Dec 31, 1952.

Blair Mays

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Great story you did about Hank Williams. Also interesting comments by Blair Mays. These times are approximate but seems like I remember Carr’s account has them on Dec. 31 flight from Knoxville at 3:30 pm which got turned around due to weather, then checking in the hotel in Knoxville at around 7:30 pm and checking out around 10:00 pm on Dec. 31. Carr says two porters helped Hank to and from the room but the clerk apparently only saw Carr. Then there is the patrolman who stopped Carr also on the 31st. The patrolman’s account is that Hank probably died at the hotel and that Hank was probably dead when he stopped Carr but he did not check further - just took Carr’s word that Hank was drunk/asleep. My question is are the date and times of the flight, hotel, and speeding ticket confirmed? Seems like that info would be available somewhere. Mr. Mays story seems sincere and I agree that Carr’s account does mix details depending on who you’re reading - but it would seem to be fairly easy to corroborate whether these three separate events (events that should be well documented - flight ticket, hotel register, ticket and court papers) actually took place on the 31st as Carr indicates. Of course I’m just basing this on info I’ve read (I could have missed something or have date wrong), but if three separate events with unrelated people are documented as occurring on the 31st, it would be difficult to square this with Mr. Mays account. jmo. Thanks

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My mother who turned 80 this month (October 2008) Lived by Hank’s mother in Montgomery during this time. When Hank died his mother went through his car, car trunk suitcases, boxes from his car and throwed Hanks things on the street in Montgomery. My mother has told this story many times over the years. She said she cried watching his own family be so disrespectful of his things. Hats, papers, clothing thrown on the street from the car she had ask about shortly after Hank died. She was only interested in material things. She was not interested in her talented song writing son. Hank had problems with addictions that was probably brought on by his mother at a young age. How heartless she must have been. My mother was crying and trying to salvage a great mans belongings, his mother was dumping it out.

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I enjoyed the story it was great…it made my mothers story more real on what she at witnessed long ago on the Montgomery streets. She lived by Hanks mother, a neighbor, I am glad I was not there.

Judy batson, Birmingham, Alabama

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I believe Blair’s version of events because the autopsy report clearly says Hank had been recently beaten up and specifically says he was hit very hard in the groin and had contusions, welts and hemorrhaging. Furthermore rigor mortis had set in by the time he was pronounced dead at Oak Hill, indicating he had been dead for some time, far longer than it take to drive the 50 miles from Bluefield even in bad weather. It’s amazing this wasn’t investigated further. There was an inquest that resulted in Toby Marshall the “quack” doctor going back to prison, but it certainly warranted more investigation.

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By Blair Mays (2)....

To set the case right the 55th anniversary of Hank Williams death is Dec 31, 1952.....not the Jan. 1 1953 date that his 1st driver Andy Carr has been using all the years to cover his tracks. What Carr did on the last day of 1952 borders on negligent homicide. He has been profiting shamelessly.

Along with Jimmy Rodgers before him he is perhaps the most important white figure to bring the black American tradition of blues to a white audience. On the last day of 1952 the most popular tunes of the day were world war II vintage big bands--and then there was Hank whose popularity was only beginning to snowball. After his death his popularity became an seismic event. All modern American popular music forms date to this last day of 1952. His last popular band tunes are right there on the edge of rock and roll if you listen

closely. In fact his guitarist was recording with Elvis less than a year later. Bob Dylan has recently bought up some of his un-finished stuff and in the tradition of Robert Johnson he may chart a half a century after his death.

Here is an eyewitness account of his death. His death was closer to that of Elvis than you might have imagined.

Hank's first driver has become a principal with the Hank Williams museum when, actually he may have committed the crime of negligent homicide on that last day of 1952. I am an eyewitness and will no longer have peace until the truth about Carr is known.

Here are the facts. The date of death was Dec. 31, 1952 not Jan. 1, 1953

Driver Carr and Hank evidently left Knoxville on Dec 30--not Dec 31 1952 as I remember them arriving in Bluefield at the King Tut Drive-In at about 10 am on Dec 31, 1952. There is an arrest record in Tennessee for which Carr was cited for speeding which should settle that. There is a story that Hank obtained morphine (or whatever) from a Dr. Horton in Bluefield--this doctor was repeatedly busted for dispensing drugs without a prescription or perfunctorily, thru-out the 50's. I have no way of verifying that but can testify to the following. I was in and out of the Tut all day as was my usual itinerary those days, and observed Hank with one and maybe no more than 2 beers-- of which he drank little or none. I did observe Hank injecting something into his arm in while sitting in the back seat of the Cadillac less than hour before his death (about 4 pm Dec 31, 1952). In fact Driver Carr sent me inside the Tut to get Tut owner Sox White; Sox tried to get Hank to withdraw the needle, but the damage was already done. Less than an hour later Carr sent me in to get Sox again. Sox came out and checked Hank's pulse and then went back inside and got a mirror which he placed under Hank's nose. (Sox's wife was nurse at he hospital in town). He told Carr "this man is dead and get him the hell off premises as he didn't want an trouble here". Carr left and only came back to the Tut after he reported Hank's death about 12 hours later and 50 miles up the road at Oak Hill WV. Hank's Cadillac and two or three police cars were at the Tut from about 5-9 pm the next day Jan 1, 1953. Sox and waitress Hazel Schultz paid 2 visits to the car business next door that belonged to my dad and forcefully insisted that I shut up and stay out of the Tut while the cops were there.

The reason why Carr and Hank spent the day at the Tut was that they were waiting for Bluefield taxi driver Danny Surface to get off taxi duty. Snow was flying and the weather was turning bad. Pre-Interstate WV roads were extremely treacherous in those days and Carr had driven over 2 mountains, each of which took about an hour at 15 mph in good weather--the second mountain immediately before Bluefield. The connection of the second driver was made at the Tut--Danny Surface was waitress Hazel Schultz's boyfriend. Hank and original driver Carr went uptown at about 12pm Dec 31 to the Dough Boy Diner where taxi drivers hung out between rides-- to arrange for Surface to take over driving duties (to Charleston WV). Carr and Hank returned to the Tut before 1 pm. As the name indicates the Doughboy was your typical WWI joint and was quite derelict by then. The Tut was your stereotypical WWII WV beer joint. It was built with a surplus Quonset hut in 1945 but was paneled in real hardwood inside and was quite a place with a wrap-around bar. Sox had a stainless steel kitchen and had the best short orders in town. About 20 -30 people saw Hank there that day--but no one paid too much attention to Hank except Hazel Schultz--who swooned and acted much like and rock and roll groupie from the 60's. Hazel had left at about 3pm to work a shift at the already mentioned Doughboy. (ie she double shifted all the way through the 50's and became owner of the Tut after Sox died in the 70's). The juke box was extremely dull in 52 except for left-over WWII swing tunes and 2 or 3 of Hank's tunes. After Hank died several more of his tunes became hits. A Hank tune was playing on the art deco Juke when he first came in that morning and through-out the day.

Hank was extremely sick the whole day and spent most of time leaning on the counter. He was ejected by Sox after Hazel left at about 3pm for fighting. Driver Car was outside in the Cadillac running the heater while it happened. A bar regular was dancing on the dance floor with his girl friend to a Hank tune and drunkenly started beating her up on the floor. Hank jumped up from the bar stool and got between them. The drunk who was about 280lbs hit Hank hard with an uppercut to the nuts. Sox always responded to these things with a butcher knife waving over his head and EJECTED HANK INSTEAD OF THE DRUNK-- after all the drunk was a REGULAR. Most of those barflies who saw Hank that day didn't believe it was actually him. Some like Sox didn't care or considered as just a "washed up radio singer" who had just been ejected from the Opry. Superstar Hank didn't emerge until after his death.

It was common knowledge around Bluefield that Hank was at the Tut and at the Doughboy the day of his death during the 50's on up into the 60's. The local newspaper was right beside the Doughboy in those days and never printed anything about his death , but merely reprinted an article from Oak Hill. Maybe the drug connection was too much, but there is no way they couldn't have known. In about 59-60 Patsy Cline and Hank's first wife paid the Tut a short visit. Hazel and Sox paid my dad a visit and told me to keep my mouth shut. Patsy Cline had gone to beautician's school in Bluefield right before her Career took off less than a mile from the Tut. By the late 60's the common knowledge based on first hand experience was waining with death of the Tut patrons of the early 50's.

It is pretty certain that taxi driver Danny Surface didn't know that Hank was already dead when he took over as driver from Carr. It is unknown what they did with the dead Hank in the back seat from about 5 or 6 pm Dec 31 until the death was reported about 12 hours later. Evidently there was an arrangement with Hank's property in the trunk as Surface admitted selling 2 handguns belonging to Hank on several occasions when he stopped by my dad's car lot during the 50's and 60's. He was very slight of build and oftentimes wore one of Hank's white handmade cowboy jackets until his death. This jacket is the same one as that which appeared on a record jacket cover.

If you examine the 50's version of the death you will see Danny Surface mentioned in all the accounts including that of the undertaker. He is listed as the driver at the time of the death. Later accounts by Carr delete him altogether or alternately list him as being picked up in Tennessee--where he never lived in his life--he was a life-long resident of Bluefield. Early accounts by Carr mention "a stop" at the Doughboy (which was off the main road unlike the Tut). Later accounts after Surface died eliminate any mention of stopping in Bluefield at all.

I am willing to take a lie detector test to verify these facts. I would like to see Carr do the same thing and own up to negligent homicide for not taking Hank to the hospital after Sox ejected them from the Tut. He has been living on Hank's legend since Dec 31, 1952.

Blair Mays
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By Blair Mays (3)....

afterward;

Andy Carr sold posters for Hank's Dec 31, 1952 concert at Charleston WV and Jan 1, 1953 concert at Canton Ohio (out of the trunk of Hank's Cadillac) for years afterwards. The single most celebrated person (aside from the Cadillac last ride at these anniversary bashes at the Hank Williams Museum in Alabama is none other than Andy Carr.

After Hank was ejected from the Tut he got Carr to open the trunk of the Caddy.... Andrew Carr sent me inside to get owner Sox White and both stopped Hank from going back inside.

Bluefield driver Danny Surface made it known that he had 2 of Hank's pistols. He said he sold them to a to-remain-anonymous Nashville "personality" in the late 50's. He wore Hank's white jacket oftentimes until (Surface's) death in the 70's.

Within about 15-20 minutes he self-administered the fatal dose and Carr sent me back in to get Sox.

You can trace Carr's ever-changing version of the truth with a little research yourself--even on the internet. If I had gone to the police I would have been unwelcome in the Tut from then on. Even my mother warned me not to get involved. What set me off was the 50th anniversary story and Carr's profiting on what is really negligent homicide and more.

Lot's of people around Bluefield knew at least one aspect of Hank's last day in Bluefield up into the late 60's-70's. I'm pretty sure Patsy Cline was among them. For me I'm perfectly willing to take a lie detector test of any kind on the issue of Hank's last day in Bluefield WV--something which I am sure Carr will never do. Better move expeditiously if interested as I have a cancerous tumor .......B Mays
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By Blair Mays (4)....

After owner Sox White couldn't find any pulse, he ordered first driver Carr off premises. Carr didn't take Hank to the hospital but left in the direction of downtown Bluefield..... Carr called the promoter of the Charleston WV gig (scheduled for that night 8 or 9 pm [Dec 31, 1952] and informed the promoter that Hank would not be able to make it.

If Hank was dead at 4-5pm (it was still daylight) the call was made at about 6pm. Carr never mentioned that Hank was presumably dead. There is on-line proof of this call in a WV state magazine publication ie Goldenseal which can be googled. The call was made from Bluefield.

Hank spent his last day (Dec 31, 1952) very sick the entire day. He had a sandwich or two before him and some open beers--of which he partook little, if any of either. I made it my business to know such things in those days as I was running errands for change (soft drinks, hamburgers, beer etc) for the business next door (a car lot). When Hank ordered, I hit him up for a soda. He had no change at all as Carr had all his money. He gave me a guitar pick instead.

Donny Surface was the name everyone knew him by around Bluefield. He was a life-long resident of Bluefield and never lived in Tennessee. He was a life-long boyfriend of Hazel Schultz and taxi driver in town. He was an extremely thin guy like Hank and in fact wore Hank's jacket around Bluefield for years until his death in the 70's. He was Hazel Schultz's boyfriend all those years even though she was married and divorced a couple of times. Donny Surface made it known that he had 2 of Hank's pistols (for sale) for years and said he did sale them to "a Nashville personality" (ie to remain anonymous) in the late 50's. He visited my father's car lot many time until his death.

If memory serves me Hank and Carr left Knoxville about midnight Dec 30. Today the drive to Bluefield is about 4 1/2 hours. Route 11 even in those days was relatively straight and even had a few 4-laned stretches, but at Wytheville route 52 to Bluefield was extremely slow-especially in the winter. Two mountains, Big Walker and East River could have taken an hour each pre-interstate.

It could have taken as much as 8 hours in 1952. In fact they arrived right at opening time at King Tut in Bluefield at about 10 am Dec 31. Carr may have been familiar with the Tennessee to Roanoke route (where he lived for years) but the mountains were snow covered and must have scared him to death. He asked Hazel for he could fine an experienced driver--she recommended Donny. Later at noon she left for the Dough Boy where she double-shifted.

Hank and Carr spent the day at the Tut except for a trip up town to meet Surface. Surface agreed to drive but didn't get off until 5 or 6. Owner Sox ordered Carr off premises when he couldn't find a pulse between 4-5 pm. Obviously Carr didn't take Hank to the hospital. But he did manage to call the Charleston WV promoter to tell him that Hank couldn't make the 8 or 9 pm gig there. He didn't mention that Hank was dead......

After 4-5 pm Dec 31 I have no further knowledge. However Carr was back at the Tut with the Cadillac about 5pm the next night. Jan 1, 1953.

Hank's trunk was full of items that were later sold by Carr and Surface. When Sox put a mirror under Hank's nose and could detect no breath and checked Hank's pulse and found nothing (his wife was an RN at a Bluefield hospital).... and then ordered Carr off premises.....Carr didn't take Hank to the hospital ...but waited to pickup Surface who was coming off a taxi shift....

An Abingdon Va. man offered to give me a Hank poster for a museum which is still available... he bought this poster in the 50's from Carr.

What Carr did would still be considered negligent homicide in many places. Since he is a principal at the museum where the car is--honor him for his truthfulness if you wish.

The day Carr and Hank came in Dec 31 Carr never introduced himself and told me to leave Hank alone when I was talking to him. When he wanted me to run several errands to Sox he referred to me as "kid", never bothering to learn my name. I became aware of his name only later.... Over the years he has used "Andrew" and Charles. The old man with poster called him "Andy". His story has changed over the years drastically. On the internet you can check it if you please. Most of the time he has lived around Roanoke Va before moving back to Alabama.

The fact remains he left Knoxville around midnight (ie Dec 30) and he made a call to the Charleston WV promoter cancelling that Dec 31 gig at about 6 pm Dec 31....without ever mentioning that Hank was dead; this article is on-line in the WV state magazine Goldenseal.

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Audio Files VBR MP3
A Tramp on the Street 3.3 MB
At The Cross 1.6 MB
Be Careful of Stones That You Throw 6.9 MB
Beautiful Home 2.2 MB
Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain 1.1 MB
Blue Love (In My Heart) 993.2 KB
Blue Love (In My Heart) (Audrey) 6.1 MB
Build Me A Cabin In The Corner Of Gloryland 2.0 MB
California Zephyr 2.3 MB
Cherokee Boogie 2.3 MB
Cool Water 4.1 MB
Dear Brother (Audrey) 6.2 MB
Dear Brother (Hank & Audrey) 3.8 MB
Deck Of Cards 3.8 MB
Dixie (1949) 2.2 MB
Don't Be Too Quick to Judge (Audrey) 2.4 MB
Drifting Too Far From The Shore 1.6 MB
Dust on the Bible 1.2 MB
Farther Along 1.1 MB
First Year Blues 2.2 MB
Freight Train Blues 1.2 MB
From Jerusalem To Jerico 2.7 MB
Gathering Flowers For The Master's Bouquet (1) 1.8 MB
Gathering Flowers For The Master's Bouquet (2) 3.2 MB
Gathering Flowers For The Master's Bouquet (3) 2.2 MB
Hang My Head And Cry 2.9 MB
Hank Jr. on Hank Sr. 681.8 KB
Have I Told You Lately That I Love You 1.1 MB
Help Me Understand 6.8 MB
Help Me Understand (Audrey) 3.0 MB
Help Me Understand (Demo) 6.7 MB
Honky Tonkin' (Audrey) 2.0 MB
How Can You Refuse Him Now (Audrey) 2.1 MB
I Can't Tell My Heart That 3.3 MB
I Can't Tell my Heart That (Hank) 3.3 MB
I Can't Tell My Heart That (Johnny & Jack) 3.5 MB
I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know (Audrey) 2.4 MB
I Hang My Head and Cry 2.5 MB
I Heard My Mother Praying For Me (w Audrey) (1) 1.6 MB
I Heard My Mother Praying For Me (w Audrey) (2) 2.0 MB
I Heard My Mother Praying For Me (w Audrey) (3) 2.0 MB
I Heard My Savior Call (1) 1.5 MB
I Heard My Savior Call (2) 2.0 MB
I Heard My Savior Call (3) 1.9 MB
I Heard My Savior Call (4) 2.1 MB
I Just Don't Like This Kind Of Livin' 11.3 MB
If I Didn't Love You 2.7 MB
I'll Fly Away (1) 1.0 MB
I'll Fly Away (2) 1.9 MB
I'll Fly Away (3) 1.8 MB
I'll Sail My Ship Alone (1) 3.4 MB
I'll Sail My Ship Alone (2) 4.0 MB
I'm Bound For That Promised Land (1) 2.2 MB
I'm Bound For The Promised Land (2) 3.2 MB
I'm Going Home (Demo) 3.1 MB
I'm going to play the fiddle 367.8 KB
In My Dreams You Still Belong to Me (Demo) 5.5 MB
Interview with Alexander City, AL DJ Bob McKinnon March of 1950 9.2 MB
I've Been Down That Road Before 11.9 MB
Just When I Needed You (1) 2.4 MB
Just When I Needed You (2) 2.3 MB
Just When I Needed You (3) 2.7 MB
Let Me Sit Alone and Think (Audrey) 5.7 MB
Live at the Grand Ole Opry (1951-2-23) 10.1 MB
Lonely Tombs 1.6 MB
Lonely Tombs (1) 2.0 MB
Lonely Tombs (2) 2.1 MB
Lonely Tombs (3) 3.2 MB
Lord, Build Me A Cabin 2.5 MB
Lost on the River (Audrey) 5.8 MB
Low And Lonely 1.6 MB
Low And Lonely (Audrey) 3.2 MB
Neath a Cold Gray Tomb of Stone (Demo) 6.6 MB
Next Sunday, Darling, Is My Birthday 2.2 MB
Ocean of Love (Audrey) 4.6 MB
On Top of Old Smoky 1.3 MB
One Way Ticket To The Sky 1.7 MB
Parakeet Polka (Audrey) 5.8 MB
Pins And Needles 2.7 MB
Ramblin' Gal (Audrey) 2.1 MB
Roly Poly 1.9 MB
San Antonio Rose 2.0 MB
Seaman's Blues (1) 3.0 MB
Seaman's Blues (2) 2.8 MB
Searching For A Soldier's Grave (1) 12.2 MB
Searching for A Soldier's Grave (2) 3.8 MB
Singing Waterfall (Demo) 4.5 MB
Softly and Tenderly 2.7 MB
Something Got a Hold of Me (Hank & Audrey) 4.6 MB
Something Got A Hold On Me (w Audrey) (1) 2.1 MB
Something Got A Hold On Me (w Audrey) (2) 2.1 MB
Sowly You Taught Me (Audrey) 2.2 MB
Stars In Her Eyes 12.5 MB
Take My Hand Precious Lord 1.6 MB
Ten Little Numbers 3.0 MB
Tennessee Border 2.3 MB
The Battle of Armageddon 2.8 MB
The Blind Child's Prayer 1.1 MB
The Funeral 5.9 MB
The Great Judgement Morning 1.9 MB
The Old Country Church 2.8 MB
The Pale Horse And His Rider 14.2 MB
There's Nothing as Sweet as My Baby (Demo) 4.7 MB
They're Asking Me To Stay (Audrey) 4.9 MB
Thirty Pieces Of Silver 2.5 MB
To My Pal Bocephus (Audrey) 2.4 MB
Too Many Parties and Too Many Pals 7.0 MB
Unreleased apology one (apology two was the official and released version) 7.6 MB
Wait For The Light To Shine 11.8 MB
WCKY Death Announcement (1953-01-01) 5.8 MB
Weary Blues From Waitin' 2.4 MB
What Put the Pep in Grandma (Audrey) 2.5 MB
When God Dips His Love Into My Heart 1.5 MB
When the Fire Comes Down From Heaven 810.6 KB
When The Saints Go Marchin In 917.2 KB
Where He Leads Me, I Will Follow 805.5 KB
Where The Old Red River Flows (1) 3.5 MB
Where The Old Red River Flows (2) 3.4 MB
Where The Old Red River Flows (3) 3.5 MB
Where The Old Red River Flows (4) 3.6 MB
With Tears in My Eyes 5.2 MB
You Blotted My Happy School Days 2.6 MB

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2 comments:

  1. Very fascinating to study this account....
    Bill Turner
    NARAS-NY Chapter

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love all these selected songs , some that has never been heard before , maybe it's time to put them on record (CD)

    ReplyDelete